Passing Props to Route Components

Using $route in your component creates a tight coupling with the route which limits the flexibility of the component as it can only be used on certain URLs.

To decouple this component from the router use option props:

Instead of coupling to $route:

const User = {
  template: '<div>User {{ $route.params.id }}</div>'
}
const router = new VueRouter({
  routes: [
    { path: '/user/:id', component: User }
  ]
})

Decouple it by using props

const User = {
  props: ['id'],
  template: '<div>User {{ id }}</div>'
}
const router = new VueRouter({
  routes: [
    { path: '/user/:id', component: User, props: true }

    // for routes with named views, you have to define the `props` option for each named view:
    {
      path: '/user/:id',
      components: { default: User, sidebar: Sidebar },
      props: { default: true, sidebar: false }
    }
  ]
})

This allows you to use the component anywhere, which makes the component easier to reuse and test.

Boolean mode

When props is set to true, the route.params will be set as the component props.

Object mode

When props is an object, this will be set as the component props as-is. Useful for when the props are static.

const router = new VueRouter({
  routes: [
    { path: '/promotion/from-newsletter', component: Promotion, props: { newsletterPopup: false } }
  ]
})

Function mode

You can create a function that returns props. This allows you to cast parameters into other types, combine static values with route-based values, etc.

const router = new VueRouter({
  routes: [
    { path: '/search', component: SearchUser, props: (route) => ({ query: route.query.q }) }
  ]
})

The URL /search?q=vue would pass {query: 'vue'} as props to the SearchUser component.

Try to keep the props function stateless, as it's only evaluated on route changes. Use a wrapper component if you need state to define the props, that way vue can react to state changes.

For advanced usage, check out the example.

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